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Some Dried Peppers In Nigeria

by on October 7, 2019
 

Peppers are one of the most commonly preserved ingredients across Nigeria.

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Sun-dried, all sorts of peppers are available in super markets – whole, dried and also ground to what Nigerians call ‘dry pepper’.

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They go in spice blends, like yaji – a mix of defatted peanuts and spices, used in suya

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Here’s an attempt to identify and categorise the peppers, linking dried to fresh, sharing it’s common forms and uses where possible.

And here are a few close ups:

Tatashe, Tattasai

Commonly sold fresh and less so, dried. The first time I even thought about these peppers dried was in Spain, I believe. They are similar to the peppers from which paprika – the spice – is made.

And then a few years ago, I started seeing this in markets and it pleased my soul – just the thought that we’re getting more value out of our produce – managing post harvest losses by channeling some energy to preserve excess.

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I’m also thrilled to see Nigerian companies begin to process the dried peppers into ground, powder. This is the future – added value out of each and every crop, produce.

At Oyingbo market in Lagos, you might find them in the northern Nigerian sections, tied up in bags – dried, or in water-filled, re hydrated, ready-to-use bags!

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Scotch Bonnets/ Habaneros/ Cameroon Pepper

The most common form of fresh peppers also exist dried. The yellow variety are the most commonly dried scotch bonnets/ habaneros sold in the markets.

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Fresh & dried – Scotch bonnet. Fresh is commonly called Nsukka pepper/ ose Nsukka; dried is more commonly referred to as Cameroun pepper

Sometimes though – as in the photo below – there’s a mix of peppers, marketed as dried yellow ones but it is evident that there is a mix of colours. These peppers are smoke and air dried, delivering great flavour whenever used.

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Dried mixed scotch bonnets & habaneros – sold as Cameroun pepper. Though Cameroun pepper is yellow, it’s evident that these also include red one. They are smoke dried.

‘Barkono’

I couldn’t find much botanical information about this variety of pepper so if you have, please share. I know they are used in yaji and other spice blends.

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There are a lot more so this may be revised in future but for now, lets go with this.

I’m open to receiving more info so hit me with it :).

And if you want to know more about the fresh versions, here’s a post for you!

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