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What Shall We Call It – D’Asun, DundunAsun, AsunDundun, Asundu[n]?

by on June 12, 2017
 

You can see it right? That it doesn’t matter what you call it, its delicious any which way.

Three things…wait five:

  • I’m from Edo state and yam is in our blood. In fact, I daresay my bones are made from the creamiest, most delicious tubers of yam.
  • I love fried yam. And goatmeat. I remember creating a delicious pairing of Cabrit and Fried yam on a virtual culinary tour a few years ago. So yummmmmmm
  • My favourite restaurant in Lagos is TerraKulture. I only ever order the fried yam and goat meat because what else is there?
  • Did I say three? Well 4. Maybe even 5. At 4 is the idea of yam hash where I combined cubes of boiled yam, then pan fried them with vegetables and stew – meat wasn’t the focus here
  • And then, this weekend past when I created asundodo, I realized that I yam would work a TREAT so there…

You’ll need:

Fried yam, steamed, cubed, soaked in water over night, strained and then deep fried. I know – many steps but all about deliciousness

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You’ll also need Asun (I ordered some in); fresh onions, thinly sliced; and a mix of green and red (bell) peppers – I used Tatashe -, thinly sliced or in small dice.

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Then you’re ready. Sautee asun and veg. Once hot, add diced and fried yam…

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And combine.

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Voila. All done. It looked and tasted amazing. The yam softened in bits…the sauce was spicy, there was crunch from some parts – the ribs but also the peppers. I liked it but will do one thing next time – I’ll save some of the yam and sprinkle on top (without stirring in) next time. I think the contrast in the yam textures would make this next level!

So whaddya think?